An American Nurse at War

Brattleboro Historical Society presented ‘An American Nurse at War’ – The Story of WWI Red Cross Nurse Marion McCune Rice – on Sunday 9 November 2014. Presented by Steve Hooper with help from Tom Durnford.

 

Richard Michelman to speak at Brattleboro History Center

Our Annual Meeting and Presentation will be held November 17, 2013 at 2pm, at the Brattleboro History Center, 196 Main Street, Brattleboro. It is open to the public and light refreshments will be served.

“Growing Up in Brattleboro” Richard Michelman is a Brattleboro native and the last surviving co-author of Before Our Time. Michelman, raised in Brattleboro, taught social studies in the Brattleboro school system. His interest in history and antiques started as a teenager and became a life-long avocation, attending and working at auctions, performing appraisals and sharing his knowledge. Michelman’s father was a downtown merchant for many years, owning Michelman’s (a mens clothing store) on Main Street. He will be sharing his collection of rare stereopticon views of Brattleboro.

before our time cover

Michelman is remembered by BHS board member Karen Davis:
I remember Richard Michelman as one of the sons of the kindly gentleman who owned and operated Michelman’s Men’s Clothing Store on Main Street, Ralph Michelman, during the 1950’s and ’60’s. Richard was active at an early age as a “runner” at different auction houses, showing the item up for auction to members of the audience so they would bid against each other more actively.  Then he would deliver the item to the highest bidder.
Eventually Richard offered his expertise with antiques to clients wanting advice or appraisals.  You know about the wonderful book on Brattleboro he co-authored, an excellent compilation of articles and photographs.

BHS Board Member Chip Cummings remembers:
Richard was my 8th social studies teacher and I am also a social studies teacher, mainly U.S. History.
It was for his class that I wrote a history of the Creamery bridge that ended up in the Reformer. A couple years later I wrote the Events of the Past column for the Reformer. Richard Richard Michelman certainly played a role in inspiring me.

Join us for a fascinating afternoon learning or reminiscing of times gone by in our Brattleboro.

New England’s Colonial Meetinghouses Talk

Photographer Paul Wainwright will present at talk on New England’s colonial meetinghouses on Wednesday, September 25, at 7 PM at Brooks Memorial Library.

Using photographs of the few surviving “mint condition” meetinghouses as illustrations Wainwright will tell  the story of the society that built and used them, and the lasting impact they have had on American culture.
New England’s colonial meetinghouses embody an important yet little-known chapter in American history. Built mostly with tax money, they served as both places of worship and places for town meetings, and were the centers of life in colonial New England communities.

Wainwright has always loved photography and history, but he was captured by physics in high school, eventually getting a PhD in it from Yale. He worked for many years at Bell Labs, with photography being a continuing avocation. Since 2001 he has been pursuing his love of photography and history full-time, and is especially drawn to photograph historic structures in personal and introspective ways. Wainwright’s book, A Space for Faith: The Colonial Meetinghouses of New England,was published in 2010.

The talk is sponsored by the  by the Vermont Humanities Council